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"You insult me! If Alfred is minded to offer so little, then I am minded to bring her into this hall and allow each man here take his turn! I swear she will be tied to a cart and she will travel the kingdoms. Is that what you want... Saxon? Do not insult me."
—Sigefrid to Uhtred after his offer for Æthelflæd's release[src]

Sigefrid Thurgilson was a main character and antagonist in both The Saxon Stories novel series, and The Last Kingdom television series. He was a Danish earl and the brother of Erik Thurgilson.

BiographyEdit

The Saxon StoriesEdit

(To Be Added)

The Last KingdomEdit

Season 2Edit

Eoferwic, Northumbria; Sigefrid belittles and attacks Hrothweard, just before he and Erik prepare to lead their men into war. They leave the city under Hæsten’s control. He reminds them that what they need more than silver is women. ("Episode 2.1")

Sigefrid and Erik arrive in Eoferwic. Erik assures Sigefrid that they are not defeated. Men will come and they will take Eoferwic back. They later attend the negotiation with King Guthred. They are familiar with Uhtred's reputation. They thank him for killing Ubba. They’ve gained much wealth since his demise. King Guthred is willing to negotiate with them, but he will kill them if necessary. In exchange for peace, he will offer them a fortress at Dunholm, which currently belongs to Kjartan. They will take it from Kjartan. One way to defeat him is to deny him food and freedom. They would need to surround him with men, with defenses and deny him what he needs to live. Their men would need to be fed and remain sober, for months. It would take too much time and too many men, some hundreds of men, Uhtred retorts. However, King Guthred agrees with Sigefrid and Erik. ("Episode 2.2")

The brothers align with Guthred in Cumbraland for a time, but when Ælfric, uncle of Uhtred discovers that he was sold into slavery when Guthred had promised him Uhtred's head and leaves, Sigefrid and Erik leave as well and begin raiding nearby villages. ("Episode 2.3")

Uhtred enters Sigefrid’s tent. He is disarmed by Sigefrid’s woman, and then Uhtred and Sigefrid exchange blows. Uhtred cuts off Sigefrid’s hand and then drags him out the tent for all to see. Finan and Steapa stand by his side. Erik and Hæsten arrive. Sigefrid orders his brother to kill Uhtred, but Erik instead tries to bargain with him. Erik gives Uhtred his word that he is willing to pay whatever price necessary. He tells Erik to take one ship and leave Northumbria, never to return. Erik agrees to his terms and takes his brother and cauterizes his hand. ("Episode 2.4")

Eventually, this breeds a deep hatred for Uhtred, and after returning from Frankia with men to serve them, the brothers develop a plan to capture and kill Uhtred. ("Episode 2.5")

Sigefrid and Erik then capture Lundene and and await the Saxon assault. When Uhtred and Æthelred are dispatched to retake Lundene, Sigefrid and Erik pull out all their men and make for the Saxon camp. ("Episode 2.6")

The brothers capture Æthelflæd and plan to ransom her off for gold and silver enough to create an army to rival that of Alfred. However, Erik falls in love with Æthelflæd and attempts to escape with her. ("Episode 2.7")

Sigefrid kills Erik to protect their wealth but fails to stop Uhtred, Finan and others from escaping the fortress with Æthelflæd. Sigefrid charges into battle with the Devonshire fyrd and the army of Wessex after Alfred meets Odda outside the fortress to stop his attack. Sigefrid makes his final stand by dueling with Uhtred, but in the end Æthelflæd kills him with a sword through his heart from behind. ("Episode 2.8")

Killed Victims Edit

This list shows the victims Sigefrid has killed:

This list shows the victims Sigefrid has killed:

AppearancesEdit

The Saxon StoriesEdit

Books 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
The Saxon Stories                        

The Last KingdomEdit

Episodes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Season 1                
Season 2
Season 3
Season 4
Season 5

Trivia Edit

  • The name Sigefrid comes from Old Germanic. The name is made up of the words sige, which means "victory", and friþ, which means "protection, peace".
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